Is Black Cinema Making a Comeback?

Starving for Substance on the Big Screen

Best-Man-Holiday-Full-Trailer

Why is it that, however infrequent, when black people create a film that is about our community that isn’t contingent upon slavery, gun violence, poverty and overt buffoonery, Hollywood and film critics alike are absolutely shocked by how well it does?

Originally posted on Huffington Post

I’m not an avid moviegoer. Rarely do I find films that I am just dying to see that will get me off my couch, away from my Apple TV, and headed to the theater. Yet, this past weekend I found myself race-walking through D.C.’s Georgetown, rushing to the 7 p.m. screening of the The Best Man Holiday. I was so excited at the prospect of seeing substantive, affluent, funny and thoughtful black characters on the silver screen that I didn’t even want to miss the previews — it was that serious.

The movie was phenomenal, by the way, but this isn’t a review piece. It’s an inquisitive one.

Why is it that, however infrequent, when black people create a film that is about our community that isn’t contingent upon slavery, gun violence, poverty and overt buffoonery, Hollywood and film critics alike are absolutely shocked by how well it does? The headlines reviewing the movie’s success at the box office have been down-right insulting. After readingUSA Today’s “race-themed film soars”, and countless “Best Man shocks at the box office,” posts, I wanted to scream.

Read the full piece at Huffington Post and leave your comments!