Ladies Who Brunch

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(Photos courtesy of Kenya Handy)

For years we have wanted to design an event for and with like-minded, thoughtful and fashionably political women (our Polinistas) in mind. Last month all of our couch-talk and strategic conspiring finally paid off and we curated our first Politini brunch salon.

Why a salon and not just a brunch?

We love to pay homage to a time when people didn’t just gather to eat and fill their glasses, but to share stories, discuss current affairs and build camaraderie. Women need a sacred space and time to connect to other women—especially black women, which is why our first salon, was dedicated to the brilliance and beauty that black women embody.

This past year, there has been a slew of conversations about whether “women can have it all”, “leaning in”, or “marrying well”. Often missing from this dialogue was the lived experiences of black women and for those of us who have reached a certain level of success—how lonely and colorless it is at the top. While there may be more black women in the workforce than our white counterparts we as Jay-Z raps see fewer “blacks the higher we go”. This feeling of loneliness and lack of connectedness to our sisters is palpable. On one hand you are cheered for being successful and on the other you are jeered for thinking you are “better than everyone else”.

It was in the spirit of connectedness that we brought a group of 12 women together at a lovely home in Bethesda. The women ranged from a president of a national non-profit to a venture capitalist to writers to cultural architects and more. The energy in the space couldn’t be contained—with each woman thanking us for creating an environment where they didn’t have to “teach”, act as the “perfect negro” or “play the part”, and that they could just relax and absorb the love and knowledge that was overflowing in the room.

“We have so much to share and give to one another”, one of the attendees said. This is the purpose of the Politini salon—to provide a creative and nurturing space for passionate and brilliant women to better connect to themselves and one another.

Being a part of the only-one club is difficult for successful black women and it is important that each of generate a space where we can come together, relax and enjoy each other—bond over our shared experiences and gain knowledge from our differences. Needless to say we wish the day had never ended (we stayed with our gracious hosts well passed brunch time☺).

We left the salon with a sense of gratitude and oneness for as one attendee referred to “the Goddess circle” we enjoyed. As she said, “when we as black women treat ourselves as Goddesses those around us will respond in kind”—amen!

Check out some pictures below:
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